How to follow the eruptions of volcanoes in Iceland and Papua New Guinea

Quartz

Two minutes past midnight this morning, after weeks of rattling Iceland with hundreds of earthquakes, the volcano Bárðarbunga finally erupted. Magma breached the surface in a lava field in Holuhraun, the Icelandic Meteorological Office reported, in what’s called a “fissure eruption,” seeping through a roughly one-kilometer crack that had formed days before.

Aerial view of Bárðarbunga's fissure. Aerial view of Bárðarbunga’s fissure.

While the media’s eyes were glued to Iceland’s skyline, far to the east another volcano erupted. The volcano—Papua New Guinea’s Mount Tavurvur—has a reputation for being one of the region’s most active. It certainly looks that way:

Here’s how to keep tabs on both Bárðarbunga and Mount Tavurvur as the lava flows:

Bárðarbunga

The last time a big Icelandic volcano blew…

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